Here’s How To Fix 13 Common Stimulus Check Problems (Some With A Little Help From The IRS)

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Last week, the National Taxpayer Advocate promised that help was on the way for some taxpayers who had missing or incomplete stimulus check payments.

Today, the Advocate delivered, explaining the kinds of problems that the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will currently resolve, what some individuals need to do to receive a check, and how some taxpayers can claim the correct payment on their 2020 tax return. The Advocate also explained the types of cases the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) is equipped to handle, and how taxpayers can get help.

National Taxpayer Advocate Erin M. Collins says, about the help, “… we have held continuing discussions with the IRS about these issues, and I am pleased that the IRS has agreed to correct EIP errors in certain categories of cases.”

Here’s how to fix some common stimulus check mistakes:

  1. If you are an individual who used the Non-Filer Tool before May 17 and claimed at least one qualifying child but did not receive the portion of the check attributable to the child, you don’t need to do anything just yet. The IRS is currently issuing those payments. If you have not received a check for the portion attributable to your qualifying child by the end of August, you can call the TAS.
  2. If you are an Injured Spouse with a Form 8379 for the return used to calculate your stimulus check and your portion was withheld, you don’t need to do anything just yet. The IRS is reissuing the Injured Spouse’s share of the stimulus check if it was erroneously withheld. If you have not received a check for the portion attributable to you by the end of August, you can call the TAS.
  3. If you are an Injured Spouse but do not have a Form 8379 for the return used to calculate your stimulus check and your portion was withheld, you need to fax or mail a completed Form 8379 as soon as possible (you can find out more about Injured Spouse here and you can download Form 8379 here). If, after you submit the form, you have not received a check for the portion attributable to you by the end of August, you can call the TAS.
  4. If you returned your stimulus check (or it was stopped or not issued) based on a joint return with a deceased or incarcerated spouse, you don’t need to do anything just yet. The IRS will recalculate the check and will make direct deposits or mail paper checks in the coming weeks. If you have not received a check by mid-September, you can call the TAS.
  5. If the amount of your check was based on a 2018 or 2019 tax return where the IRS identified a Math Error, and the Math Error has been resolved, you don’t need to do anything. The IRS should release the payment automatically.
  6. If the amount of your check was based on a 2018 or 2019 tax return where the IRS identified a Math Error, and the Math Error has not been resolved, you will need to work with the IRS to correct the error before your check can be adjusted and paid. The TAS can also help resolve the error so that you can receive your check.
  7. If you are the victim of identity theft and either did not receive a check or received an incorrect amount, your check can be adjusted as part of resolving the identity theft case. You should contact the IRS to resolve the identity theft issue. The TAS can also help resolve the identity theft issue so that you can receive your check……Read More>>

 

 

Source:- forbes